Products by Lab

Blog

Thursday, 23 June 2016 10:23

Many chemists are familiar with taking trips to the espresso machine while running late-night experiments, but until now these excursions were merely undertaken for the caffeine boost. A group recently reported in the American Chemical Society's Analytical Chemistry, however, that espresso machines can quickly and inexpensively perform some complex chemistry experiments, such as testing for harmful compounds in the environment.

Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are a class of carcinogenic organic compounds that are ubiquitous in the environment. They are generated by incomplete combustion of materials in forest fires, industrial plants, and waste incinerators. To determine the levels of PAHs in soil and sediment, researchers first extract the compounds from a sample, a step that can take up to 16 hours and requires large amounts of hazardous solvents. Newer techniques that use high temperatures are faster and need much less solvent, but they require pricey lab equipment. So Francesc A. Esteve-Turrillas and colleagues set out to determine whether an espresso machine—which quickly runs hot liquid through a small amount of coffee, or in this case, soil—could efficiently extract PAHs for further analysis.

View the full article